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Utbildnings- och kultursociologi
Sociology of Education and Culture at Uppsala University



Printout from the site SEC (Sociology of Education and Culture) at Uppsala University
 URL of this page is www.skeptron.uu.se/ broady/sec/k-15-elite-edu.htm 

 

Elite education and educational strategies of elite families,
7.5 credits

[Elitutbildning och elitfamiljers utbildningsstrategier]

Intensive PhD-course, Uppsala University, May 19th–21st, 2015

Disciplin: Sociology of Education. However, also PhD- and master students in other disciplins and at other universities are wellcome to apply.

Responsible: Prof. Mikael Börjessen, mikael.borjesson@edu.uu.se, to whom applications should be sent.


TOC

Teachers
Syllabus
Literature
Schedule and localities


Teachers

Main guest teacher:
Agnès van Zanten, http://www.sciencespo.fr/osc/fr/content/agnes-van-zanten
Directrice de recherche au CNRS
Directrice du GDR RAPPE (Réseau d'Analyse Pluridisciplinaire des Politiques Educatives), Observatoire Sociologique du Changement, Sciences-Po, Paris, http://sciences-po.fr

Magne Flemmen, http://www.sv.uio.no/iss/english/people/aca/magneof/
Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo

Claire Maxwell, http://www.ioe.ac.uk/staff/HSSE/TCRU_31.html
Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Institute of Education, University of London

Teachers from SEC, Uppsala University: Mikael Börjesson, Donald Broady, Ida Lidegran, Mikael Palme


Syllabus

• 7.5 credits
• Education cycle: Third cycle
• Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: Sociology of Education
• Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (G).
• Responsible department: Department of Education

The course is part of the PhD program in Sociology of Education. It is open for PhD-students and master students that fulfil the requirements. [Also PhD- and master students in other disciplins and at other universities are wellcome to apply!]

Learning outcomes
After completion of the course the students are expected to be able to
• analyse the relationship between elite education and educational strategies of elite families
• analyse differences and similarities between elite education in various national settings
• independently and critically discuss and value theories of elite education and educational strategies of elite families

Content
The course provides an overview of both classic and contemporary work on elite education and educational strategies of elite families.
Emphasis is put on
• key concepts and vocabulary in studies of elite education and educational strategies of elite families
• national and international systems of elite education
• family socialization practices and educational strategies
• effects of school choice on elite education

Instructions
The course consists of a series of lectures and seminars. The language of instruction is English

Assessment
The assessment is based on a written assignment.


Literature

Reading list for the graduate course "Elite education and educational strategies of elite families"
Sociology of Education, Uppsala University, May 19–21, 2015

General readings
Bourdieu, P. (1989): La noblesse d’État. Grandes écoles et esprit de corps. Paris: Minuit. (pp. 1-369) (270 p.)
Khan, S. R. (2012). The sociology of elites, Annual Review of Sociology, 38: 361-377. (17 p.)
Maxwell, C. (2015). Elites: Some questions for a new research agenda. Pp. 15-28 in A. van Zanten, S. Ball, & B. Darchy-Koechlin (Eds.), Elites, privilege and excellence: The national and global redefinition of educational advantage. London: Routledge. (14 p.)
Maxwell, C. & Aggleton, P. (in press) Elite education: International perspectives. In C. Maxwell & P. Aggleton (Eds.), Elite education: International perspectives. London: Routledge.
van Zanten, A. (2009). The Sociology of Elite Education. Pp. 329-339 in M. Apple, S. Ball, L.A. Gandin (eds.), International Handbook of the Sociology of Education. London/New York: Routledge. (11 p.)
van Zanten A., Maxwell C. (2015). Elite education and the State in France: Durable ties and new challenges, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 36(1), pp. 71-94. (24 p.)
van Zanten A. (2015). Educating elites: The changing dynamics and meanings of privilege and power”, Pp. 3-12 in A. van Zanten, S. Ball, B. Darchy-Koechlin (eds.) World Yearbook of Education 2015. Elites, privilege and excellence: the national and global redefinition of educational advantage London/New York: Routledge. (10 p.)

Thème 1: Family socialization practices and follow up of students' careers
* Cucchiara, M. B., Horvat McNamara E., (2009). Perils and Promises: Middle-Class Parental Involvement in Urban Schools. American Educational Research Journal, 46(4), pp. 974-1004. (31 p.)
Lareau, A. (2015). “Cultural Knowledge and Social Inequality.” American Sociological Review, (1) 1-27. (28 p.)
Lareau, A., Lopes Munoz V. (2012). You’re Not Going to Call the Shots’: Structural Conflict Between Parents and a Principal in a Suburban Elementary School. Sociology of Education, 85(3), pp. 201-218. (19 p.)
Reay, D. (2000) A useful extension of Bourdieu’s conceptual framework? Emotional
capital as a way of understanding mothers’ involvement in their children’s education?, The Sociological Review, 48(4), pp. 568-585. (18 p.)
* Reay, D. (2005). Doing the dirty work of social class? Mothers’ work in support of their children’s schooling. The Sociological Review, 53(2), pp. 104-16. (13 p.)
* Stefansen, K. and Aarseth, H. (2011) ‘Enriching intimacy: The role of the emotional in the ‘resourcing’ of middle‐class children’, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 32(3), pp 389-405. (17 p.)
* Weininger, A., Lareau A. (2009). Class and Child Rearing: An Ethnographic Extension of Kohn, Journal of Marriage and Family, 71 (August), pp. 680-695. (16 p.)
van Zanten, A. (2015). A family affair: Reproducing elite positions and preserving the ideals of meritocratic competition and youth autonomy. Pp. 29-42 in A. van Zanten, S. Ball, & B. Darchy-Koechlin (Eds.), Elites, privilege and excellence: The national and global redefinition of educational advantage. London: Routledge. (14 p.)

Theme 2: School choices
Ball S.J., Vincent C. (2007). Education, class fractions and the local rules of spatial relations, Urban Studies, 44(7), pp. 1175-1189. (15 p.)
* Ball, S. J., & Vincent, C. (1998). ’I heard it on the grapevine’: ‘Hot’ knowledge and school choice. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 19(3), pp. 377-400. (24 p.)
Brantlinger, E., Majd-Jabbari, M., & Guskin, S. L. (1996). Self-interest and liberal educational discourse: How ideology works for middle-class mothers. American Educational Research Journal, 33(3), pp. 571-597. (27 p.)
* Raveaud M., van Zanten A. (2007). Choosing the local school ? Middle class parents’ values and social and ethnic mix in London and Paris, Journal of Education Policy, 22 (1), pp. 107-124. (18 p.)
* Reay, D. (1998). ‘Always Knowing’ and ‘Never Being Sure’: Familial and Institutional Habituses and Higher Education Choice, Journal of Education Policy 13(4), pp. 519-29. (11 p.)
Schneider, M., Buckley, J. (2002). What do parents want From schools? Evidence from the Internet, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 24(2), pp. 133-144. (12 p.)
* van Zanten A. (2013) A good match: Appraising worth and estimating quality in school choice. Pp. 77-99 in Beckert J. and Musselin C. (eds) The Constitution of Quality in Markets, Oxford, Oxford University Press. (23 p.)
van Zanten A. (2015) The determinants and dynamics of school choice : a comparative review. In P. Sepannen, A. Carrasco, M. Kalalahti, R. Rinne and H. Simola (eds.) Contrasting Dynamics in Education Politics of Extremes: School choice in Finland and Chile, Rotterdam and Boston, Sense Publishers (in press).

Theme 3 Selection and socialisation in elite institutions
Boliver V. (2013) How fair is access to more prestigious UK universities?, British Journal of Sociology, 64(2), pp. 344–364. (21 p.)
Cookson, P.W. and Persell, C.H. (1985) English and American Residential Secondary Schools: A Comparative Study of the Reproduction of Social Elites, Comparative Education Review, 29(3), pp. 283-98. (16 p.)
* Espenshade, T.J., Hale, L.E. and Chung, Chang Y. (2005) The frog pond revisited: High school academic context, class rank and elite college admission, Sociology of Education 78(4), pp. 269-293. (25 p.)
Gaztambide-Fernández, R., Cairns, K., & Desai, C. (2013). The sense of entitlement. Pp. 32-49 in C. Maxwell & P. Aggleton (Eds.), Privilege, Agency and Affect . Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. (18 p.)
* Karabel, J. (1984) Status-Group Struggle, Organizational Interests, and the Limits of Institutional Autonomy: The Transformation of Harvard, Yale and Princeton, 1918-1940, Theory and Society, 13(1), pp. 1-40. (41 p.)
Karen, D. (1990) Toward a Political-Organizational Model of Gatekeeping: The Case of Elite Colleges, Sociology of Education, 63(4), pp. 227-40. (14 p.)
* Lee, E.M. and Kramer, R. (2013)‘Out with the old, in with the new? Habitus and social
mobility at selective colleges, Sociology of Education 86(1), pp. 18–35. (18 p.)
Maxwell, C. and Aggleton, P. (2010). The bubble of privilege. Young, privately educated women talk about social class, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 31(1), pp. 3-15. (13 p.)
* Persell, C.H. and Cookson, P.W. (1985) Chartering and Bartering: Elite Education and Social Reproduction, Social Problems, 33(2), pp. 114-29. (16 p.)
Zimdars, A (2010) Fairness and undergraduate admission: a qualitative exploration of admissions choices at the university of Oxford, Oxford Review of Education 36(3), pp. 207-323. (17 p.)

Theme 4 Elite education in the UK
Maxwell, C., & Aggleton, P. (2014). The reproduction of privilege: Young women, the family and private education, International Studies in Sociology of Education, 24(2), pp. 189-209. (21 p.)
Maxwell, C. & Aggleton, P. (in press) Creating cosmopolitan subjects - the role of families and private schools in England, Sociology.
Forbes, J., & Lingard, B. (2015). Assured optimism in a Scottish girls’ school: habitus and the (re)production of global privilege, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 36(1), pp. 116–136. (21 p.)
Wakeling, P., & Savage, M. (2015). Elite universities, elite schooling and reproduction in Britain. Pp. 169-184 in A. van Zanten, S. Ball, & B. Darchy-Koechlin (Eds.), Elites, privilege and excellence: The national and global redefinition of educational advantage. London: Routledge. (16 p.)

Theme 5 Elite education in Sweden
Börjesson, M. & Broady, D. (2006): The Social Profile of Swedish Law Students. National Divisions and Transnational Educational Strategies, Rætferd, Vol. 29, No. 3 (114), Theme: "Pierre Bourdieu: From Law to Legal Field", pp. 80-107. (28 p.)
* Börjesson, M., Broady, D., Dalberg, T. & Lidegran, I. (2015): Elite Education in Sweden – A Contradiction in Terms? In Maxwell, C. & Aggleton, P. (eds): Elite Education – International Perspectives. Understanding the implications of educating elites on schooling systems, forthcoming London: Routledge. (16 p.)
* Börjesson, M. & Broady, D. (2015): Elite Strategies in a Unified System of Higher Education. The Case of Sweden. Manuscript. (20 p.)
Lidegran, I. (2009): "Summary: Educational Capital .Its Creation, Distribution, and Transmission". Pp. 241-249 in Utbildningskapital. Om hur det alstras, fördelas och förmedlas, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Studier i utbildnings- och kultursociologi 3, Uppsala universitet. (9 p.)
Palme, M. (2008): "Summary: Cultural Capital. Symbolic Assets in the Swedish Education System 1988–2008". Pp. 277-284 in Det kulturella kapitalet. Studier av symboliska tillgångar i det svenska utbildningssystemet 1988–2008. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Studier i utbildnings- och kultursociologi 1, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet. (8 p.)

Theme 6 Elite education in Norway
Hansen, Marianne N. (2005): Utdanning og ulikhet – valg, prestasjoner og sosiale settinger, Tidsskrift for samfunnsforskning, nr 2/2005, pp. 133-157. (25 p.)
Askvik, Tanja (2011): "Kap 5: Bakgrunn". Pp. 69-106 in Eliteskoler. En kvantitativ undersøkelse av videregående skoler i Oslo fra 1985-2008. Masteroppgave i sosiologi, Institutt for sosiologi og samfunnsgeografi,
Universitetet i Oslo, 30. Juni 2011. https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/15374/Askvik.pdf. (38 p.)
* Ljunggren, Jørn & Andersen, Patrick Lie (2014): Vertical and Horizontal Segregation: Spatial Class Divisions in Oslo, 1970–2003. In International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.. Publ. 22 Dec. 2014. DOI:10.1111/1468-2427.12167 (18 p.)


Schedule and localities

All rooms are in the same building - rather new, large, high-tech, lots of glass on the facade - called Campus Blåsenhus, close to the Uppsala Caste and the Botanic Garden. The Street address is von Kraemers allé 1. Room 14:340 is to be found in the wing "house 14", third floor, room no 340. Room 21:240 in the wing "house 21", second floor, room no 240. And so on..

Tuesday May 19, room 14:340
13.15-13.30 Introduction and presentation
13.30-15.00 van Zanten: Family socialization practices and follow up of students' careers
15.30-17.00 Flemmen: Elite education in Norway

Wednesday May 20
10.15-12.10 van Zanten: School choices. Room 21:240.
13.15-15.00 van Zanten: Open lecture: Excellence, privilege and power in elite education. Room: room 14:340.
15.30-17.00 Maxwell: Elite education in Great Britain. Room 14:340.
19.00 Dinner

Thursday May 21
10.15-12.15 Broady, Palme & Lidegran: Elite education in Sweden. Room 14:340.
13.15-15.00 van Zanten: Selection and socialisation at elite institutions. Room 12:228.
15.30-17.00 van Zanten & Broady: Conclusions. Room 12:228.

 

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 URL of this page is www.skeptron.uu.se/broady/sec/k-15-elite-edu.htm 

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